My Reflection

My Reflection

I have always loved writing and reading, but in this course I could only use UC’s online library for my sources and that was hard for me. One of my weakness was being able use to a mixture of books and online source, and by online I mean using Google. So I had to dig very hard to find my sources because with Google you can type in the question you have and find endless information but that’s because more than half of the results Google brings up are not scholarly sources. And for this course as well as previous courses the sources have to be creditable. But I don’t think that is a weakness anymore as a writer. I think my strength in writing is that I love to write I have been keeping a journal ever since I could remember, I have 10 now and I still write in one today. Writing comes easily to me. I even write short stories.

In my WordPress eportfolio I addressed both my weakness and strength. two things that were a part of my life. Which were my major and my Lupus. I had to make sure that I went to the library as well ask the teacher if my sources were okay, and went I was took on getting more information I would have to reach out to the library. Another great way I overcame my weakness was by going to the writing lab. In the writing lab I was able to make sure my sources were citated the correct way.

The writing that I did in this course fit into other academic writing because I now know that in some courses and soon to become all courses, I will have to use more of UC’s online library and because of this semester course I kind of know my way around the online library. So when I have a history paper due or English paper due I will probably start in the UC’s online library.

This whole course was not completely new to me, I had to write papers were we had to use online sources but not just UC’s online library. I uses google scholarly sources and I was okay. Writing about our major was not new to me at all I completely hated the idea in my previous class but the difference was that I had to write about how my major related to food. This course however gave me some lead way as to what ideas I could use related to my major. So I loved the way we had to use our major as the base for this course.

From here my writing can only improve. But in a way I still have to adjust when doing research for school I’ll be limited to online sources.  I also really like WordPress because it gave me as a writer a sense of publishing my own work and I could customize my own background and it made me feel like a published writer. So using WordPress I have two other blogs apart from my one for this course. One is about the books that I read and the other is somewhat picture based about the little things in life that make me happy.

As a writer I think I’ll always be able to form my own opinion in words probably better than I can say them but with writing I can always improve and being a writer doing research I think will become very easy to me. I will also try to keep a balance between writing on my blogs as well as pen and paper. One thing that will never change is that I will always write.

My Essay 4 Final: Kids Playing by Adult Rules

wpid-download.pngDionne Lowe

Dr. Skutar

English 1001

Argumentive Essay

6/4/2015

Kids Playing by Adult Rules

Recently the news has been filled with adolescents being prosecuted as adults; and never stepping foot inside of a juvenile court room. Just last year on the news two teenagers were arrested for assault and robbery and sentenced to 20 years in prison, they were 16 years old. Although no one had been murdered, the teens were robbing people and with a hand gun. When released, the juveniles will be 36 years old, and will have spent the majority of their life in prison. They will not be able to work because they now have a felony record of assault and robbery. This record will follow them everywhere, assuming they made it out prison alive. The courts saw fit to place 16 year olds into a confined area with rapist, and murders.

The article “Placing Juveniles in the Adult Criminal Justice System is Counterproductive” states that “Even limited exposure to such an environment can cause anxiety, paranoia, exacerbate existing mental disorders, and increase risk of suicide. In fact, youth have the highest suicide rates of all inmates in jails. Youth are 19 times more likely to commit suicide in jail than youth in the general population and 36 times more likely to commit suicide in an adult jail than in a juvenile detention facility. Jail staff are simply not equipped to protect youth from the dangers of adult jails.” Placing the youth in isolation can possible do more harm than good because they interact with no one their age. To me there was no justice for these boys. They should have had their day in juvenile court but they did not. I think the only time a juvenile should be tried as an adult is when they have committed rape or murder.

Jennifer Grimes wrote an article called “Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts”. Grimes explains the unfairness that juveniles are up against in criminal court. Stating that “Testing the assumption held by policy makers and academics that juveniles processed in criminal court are subjected to an entirely different model of justice, Kupchip utilizes a rigorous, mixed-methods research design to determine how similar cases are processed at every stage in the two court systems. He finds that, especially during the sentencing of adolescent offenders, criminal court begins to resemble its juvenile counterpart. Kupchip also concludes that prosecuting youth in criminal rather than juvenile court is inconsistent with our cultural conceptions of youthfulness.” Meaning that the thought process applied to convict a grown man for assault and robbery is also applied to convict a 16 year old boy. Grimes states that “The number of juveniles transferred to adult, criminal court has steadily increased since the mid-1970s.” This is not good at all the number of these cases have increased instead of decreasing, no one is helping our youth.

The article, “Placing Juveniles in Adult Criminal Justice System is Counterproductive” states that “Jails do not have the capacity to provide the necessary education and other programs crucial for the healthy development of adolescents. Even though legally required to, few jails provide appropriate education to youth. A BJS survey found that 40% of jails provided no educational services at all, only 11% of jails provided special education services, and only 7% provided vocational training” This means that programs that would help an adolescent get their life together are not promised in jails or prisons, which is a bigger set back in the long haul because their education has now been placed on hold.

When you have several teenagers who spend 15 months in adult prison with no way to continue their education they are more likely to re-offend. Liane Rozzell wrote the article “Alternatives to the Punishment-Oriented Juvenile Justice Model Are Necessary” states that “Children who spend time in adult prisons and jails are at much higher risk for assault, abuse, and suicide. They don’t get the services they need, and they are more likely to re-offend—sooner, more often, and more violently—than youth who stay in the juvenile system.”

Another article written by Donna M. Bishop states that “There is little reason . . . for not holding juveniles responsible under the same laws that apply to adults. The victim of a fifteen-year-old mugger is as much mugged as the victim of a twenty-year-old mugger; the victim of a fourteen-year-old murderer or rapist is as dead or raped as the victim of an older one. The need for social defense or protection is the same.” Meaning some people don’t care how old the person is if they committed a crime than they should be held accountable. I don’t feel this should be the mind set for dealing with people’s lives because we are human and we all make mistakes, especially 16 year old teenagers. A crime such as robbery where no one is murdered should be a 6 month sentence in a juvenile futility and then placed on a 1-2 year probation. They were 16 and they made one stupid mistake, which cost them their lives.

Apart from their age their background as well should be taken into account because violence is all around us. Some people no nothing different, some are forced into that down spiral of violence. Some people do not have a strong role model to help them onto the right path. Criminal Court almost never consider your background as to how to sentence you. However in juvenile court they take under consideration if you have no prior record, the seriousness of the crime, everything of that nature. As well as the fact that they are still teenagers and they need to continue their education.

I believe that there needs to be change in our society. Our future depends on our youth and we are convicting them to jail or prison. Instead of spending the taxpayer’s money to convict them, we could use that money for Recreational centers or big bother and big sister programs. The major reason adolescents get into trouble is because they are bored and have nothing positive to keep them busy. You see this a lot in elementary schools when a child is ahead in class they start to act out because they have nothing else to do but wait for the other children to catch up with them. Teenagers well make mistakes we all do and we will continue to make mistakes because we are human. I don’t agree to just let teenagers go about thinking that their actions do not have consequences because they do. However I also do not agree with treating them as adults. It’s not fair that they are kids playing by adult rules.

Now let’s go back to the reasons convicting adolescents in criminal court is not good for our youth. One there is a high suicide rate, two there education is on hold and that teenager is more likely to give up on their education, three teenagers are also more likely not only to re-offend but also more violently. Let’s also go back to the reasons that these adolescents make these stupid mistakes such as assault and robbery. One they are human, two there is no role model in their live to keep them one the right path, three they are bored, four adolescents feel that the one way to survive in their environment is to adapted to it. The result to the reason why these adolescents are convicted out way the reason why they were convicted.

As I stated previously, I feel the only reason adolescent should be charged in criminal court is when they are facing rape and or murder charges. The reason I feel this way is because a life has been taken. To me that is the ultimate inhuman thing that can been done. In an article called Juveniles Should Not Be Sentenced to Life Without Parole by Linda White states that “Sentencing youth to life without parole strips our young people of  hope and the opportunity  for rehabilitation” In November of 1986, Whites 26 year old daughter went missing and was later found sexually assaulted and dead, by two boys who were 15 years old. White also states “ Although many believe that criminals should suffer, she claims in this testimony before a subcommittee of the US House of Representatives that punishment does little to change behavior. Moreover, White maintains, one of the boys who killed her daughter suffered abuse at home and in foster care, and he tried to commit suicide several times as a young boy. When she met him, he expressed his remorse, confirming her belief in restorative justice.” Meaning she does not think an adolescent should be convicted with a life sentence. I agree but I still feel that they should be tried in a criminal court. They took a life and that person can never get their life back. White believes in restorative justice which is a system of criminal justice that focuses on the rehabilitation of offenders through reconciliation with victims and the community at large. I completely agree with this because I think this gives closure to the victims loved ones.

Some people feel very the exact same way I do about Juveniles being tried in criminal court. In the article The Criminal Justice System Should Treat Some Juveniles as Adults by James Backstrom which states that “Prosecuting juvenile offenders in adult court is appropriate and necessary in certain cases to protect public safety and hold youth appropriately accountable for their crimes.” Meaning that rape and murder should be treated as an adult. However when I say murder I mean the teenager had to had the intent to kill no questions asked. If the situation is two 15 year old boys were playing with their father’s shotgun and it goes off, killing one of them then, I think that should be tried in juvenile court.

A lot of different things should change within the juvenile system. The youth are our future. We have to protect them as well as guide them one the right path. I strongly believe in recreational centers, after school programs, and big brother and sister programs. The government would rather pay to house them in jail and prison, instead of making these programs work in everyone’s favor to protect our youth.

Works Cited

Backstrom, James C. “The Criminal Justice System Should Treat Some Juveniles as Adults.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “Adult Prosecution Is Warranted in Certai

Cases.” http://www.co.dakota.mn.us. 2008. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 June 2015.

Bishop, Donna M. “Injustice and Irrationality In.” Injustice and Irrationality In. Criminology & Public Policy, Nov. 2014. Web. 2 June 2015.

Campaign for Youth Justice. “Placing Juveniles in the Adult Criminal Justice System Is Counterproductive.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “Jailing Juveniles: The Dangers of Incarcerating Youth in Adult Jails in America.” http://www.campaignforyouthjustice.org. 2007. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 2 June 2015

Grimes, Jennifer N. “Aaron Kupchip, Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts.” New York University Press, 10 Aug. 2007. Web. 2 June 2015.

Rozzell, Liane Gay. “Alternatives to the Punishment-Oriented Juvenile Justice Model Are Necessary.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “These Are Our Children: New Models Are Transforming Juvenile Justice.” Sojourners Magazine 38 (June 2009): 7. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 3 June 2015.

White, Linda L. “Juveniles Should Not Be Sentenced to Life Without Parole.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “Testimony of Linda L. White Judiciary Committee of the US House of Representatives.” http://judiciary.house.gov. 2009. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 June 2015.

My Essay 4 Draft: Kids Playing By Rules

Dionne Lowe

Dr. Skutar

English 1001

Argumentive Essay

6/4/2015

Kids Playing by Adult Rules

Recently the news has been filled with adolescents being prosecuted as adults; and never stepping foot inside of a juvenile court room. Just last year on the news two teenagers were arrested for assault and robbery and sentenced to 20 years in prison, they were 16 years old. Although no one had been murdered, the teens were robbing people and with a hand gun. When released, the juveniles will be 36 years old, and will have spent the majority of their life in prison. They will not be able to work because they now have a felony record of assault and robbery. This record will follow them everywhere, assuming they made it out prison alive. The courts saw fit to place 16 year olds into a confined area with rapist, and murders.

The article “Placing Juveniles in the Adult Criminal Justice System is Counterproductive” states that “Even limited exposure to such an environment can cause anxiety, paranoia, exacerbate existing mental disorders, and increase risk of suicide. In fact, youth have the highest suicide rates of all inmates in jails. Youth are 19 times more likely to commit suicide in jail than youth in the general population and 36 times more likely to commit suicide in an adult jail than in a juvenile detention facility. Jail staff are simply not equipped to protect youth from the dangers of adult jails.” Placing the youth in isolation can possible do more harm than good because they interact with no one their age. To me there was no justice for these boys. They should have had their day in juvenile court but they did not. I think the only time a juvenile should be tried as an adult is when they have committed rape or murder.

Jennifer Grimes wrote an article called “Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts”. Grimes explains the unfairness that juveniles are up against in criminal court. Stating that “Testing the assumption held by policy makers and academics that juveniles processed in criminal court are subjected to an entirely different model of justice, Kupchip utilizes a rigorous, mixed-methods research design to determine how similar cases are processed at every stage in the two court systems. He finds that, especially during the sentencing of adolescent offenders, criminal court begins to resemble its juvenile counterpart. Kupchip also concludes that prosecuting youth in criminal rather than juvenile court is inconsistent with our cultural conceptions of youthfulness.” Meaning that the thought process applied to convict a grown man for assault and robbery is also applied to convict a 16 year old boy. Grimes states that “The number of juveniles transferred to adult, criminal court has steadily increased since the mid-1970s.” This is not good at all the number of these cases have increased instead of decreasing, no one is helping our youth.

The article, “Placing Juveniles in Adult Criminal Justice System is Counterproductive” states that “Jails do not have the capacity to provide the necessary education and other programs crucial for the healthy development of adolescents. Even though legally required to, few jails provide appropriate education to youth. A BJS survey found that 40% of jails provided no educational services at all, only 11% of jails provided special education services, and only 7% provided vocational training” This means that programs that would help an adolescent get their life together are not promised in jails or prisons, which is a bigger set back in the long haul because their education has now been placed on hold.

When you have several teenagers who spend 15 months in adult prison with no way to continue their education they are more likely to re-offend. Liane Rozzell wrote the article “Alternatives to the Punishment-Oriented Juvenile Justice Model Are Necessary” states that “Children who spend time in adult prisons and jails are at much higher risk for assault, abuse, and suicide. They don’t get the services they need, and they are more likely to re-offend—sooner, more often, and more violently—than youth who stay in the juvenile system.”

Another article written by Donna M. Bishop states that “There is little reason . . . for not holding juveniles responsible under the same laws that apply to adults. The victim of a fifteen-year-old mugger is as much mugged as the victim of a twenty-year-old mugger; the victim of a fourteen-year-old murderer or rapist is as dead or raped as the victim of an older one. The need for social defense or protection is the same.” Meaning some people don’t care how old the person is if they committed a crime than they should be held accountable. I don’t feel this should be the mind set for dealing with people’s lives because we are human and we all make mistakes, especially 16 year old teenagers. A crime such as robbery where no one is murdered should be a 6 month sentence in a juvenile futility and then placed on a 1-2 year probation. They were 16 and they made one stupid mistake, which cost them their lives.

Apart from their age their background as well should be taken into account because violence is all around us. Some people no nothing different, some are forced into that down spiral of violence. Some people do not have a strong role model to help them onto the right path. Criminal Court almost never consider your background as to how to sentence you. However in juvenile court they take under consideration if you have no prior record, the seriousness of the crime, everything of that nature. As well as the fact that they are still teenagers and they need to continue their education.

I believe that there needs to be change in our society. Our future depends on our youth and we are convicting them to jail or prison. Instead of spending the taxpayer’s money to convict them, we could use that money for Recreational centers or big bother and big sister programs. The major reason adolescents get into trouble is because they are bored and have nothing positive to keep them busy. You see this a lot in elementary schools when a child is ahead in class they start to act out because they have nothing else to do but wait for the other children to catch up with them. Teenagers well make mistakes we all do and we will continue to make mistakes because we are human. I don’t agree to just let teenagers go about thinking that their actions do not have consequences because they do. However I also do not agree with treating them as adults. It’s not fair that they are kids playing by adult rules.

Now let’s go back to the reasons convicting adolescents in criminal court is not good for our youth. One there is a high suicide rate, two there education is on hold and that teenager is more likely to give up on their education, three teenagers are also more likely not only to re-offend but also more violently. Let’s also go back to the reasons that these adolescents make these stupid mistakes such as assault and robbery. One they are human, two there is no role model in their live to keep them one the right path, three they are bored, four adolescents feel that the one way to survive in their environment is to adapted to it. The result to the reason why these adolescents are convicted out way the reason why they were convicted.

Works Cited

Bishop, Donna M. “Injustice and Irrationality In.” Injustice and Irrationality In. Criminology & Public Policy, Nov. 2014. Web. 2 June 2015.

Campaign for Youth Justice. “Placing Juveniles in the Adult Criminal Justice System Is Counterproductive.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “Jailing Juveniles: The Dangers of Incarcerating Youth in Adult Jails in America.” http://www.campaignforyouthjustice.org. 2007. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 2 June 2015

Grimes, Jennifer N. “Aaron Kupchip, Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts.” New York University Press, 10 Aug. 2007. Web. 2 June 2015.

Rozzell, Liane Gay. “Alternatives to the Punishment-Oriented Juvenile Justice Model Are Necessary.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “These Are Our Children: New Models Are Transforming Juvenile Justice.” Sojourners Magazine 38 (June 2009): 7. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 3 June 2015.

My Essay Final 3: Kids Playing by Adult Rules

Dionne Lowewpid-1311262097-picture_2.png

Dr. Skutar

English 1001

Argumentive Essay

6/4/2015

Kids Playing by Adult Rules

            Recently the news has been filled with adolescents being prosecuted as adults; and never stepping foot inside of a juvenile court room. Just last year on the news two teenagers were arrested for assault and robbery and sentenced to 20 years in prison, they were 16 years old. Although no one had been murdered, the teens were robbing people and with a hand gun. When released, the juveniles will be 36 years old, and will have spent the majority of their life in prison. They will not be able to work because they now have a felony record of assault and robbery. This record will follow them everywhere, assuming they made it out prison alive. The courts saw fit to place 16 year olds into a confined area with rapist, and murders.

The article “Placing Juveniles in the Adult Criminal Justice System is Counterproductive” states that “Even limited exposure to such an environment can cause anxiety, paranoia, exacerbate existing mental disorders, and increase risk of suicide. In fact, youth have the highest suicide rates of all inmates in jails. Youth are 19 times more likely to commit suicide in jail than youth in the general population and 36 times more likely to commit suicide in an adult jail than in a juvenile detention facility. Jail staff are simply not equipped to protect youth from the dangers of adult jails.” Placing the youth in isolation can possible do more harm than good because they interact with no one. To me there was no justice for these boys. They should have had their day in juvenile court but they did not. I think the only time a juvenile should be tried as an adult is when they have committed rape or murder.

Jennifer Grimes wrote an article called Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts. Grimes explains the unfairness that juveniles are up against in criminal court. Stating that “Testing the assumption held by policy makers and academics that juveniles processed in criminal court are subjected to an entirely different model of justice, Kupchip utilizes a rigorous, mixed-methods research design to determine how similar cases are processed at every stage in the two court systems. He finds that, especially during the sentencing of adolescent offenders, criminal court begins to resemble its juvenile counterpart. Kupchip also concludes that prosecuting youth in criminal rather than juvenile court is inconsistent with our cultural conceptions of youthfulness.” Meaning that the thought process applied to convict a grown man for assault and robbery is also applied to convict a 16 year old boy. Grimes states that “The number of juveniles transferred to adult, criminal court has steadily increased since the mid-1970s.” This is not good at all the number of these cases have increased instead of decreasing, no one is helping our youth.

An article called “Placing Juveniles in Adult Criminal Justice System is Counterproductive” states that “Jails do not have the capacity to provide the necessary education and other programs crucial for the healthy development of adolescents. Even though legally required to, few jails provide appropriate education to youth. A BJS survey found that 40% of jails provided no educational services at all, only 11% of jails provided special education services, and only 7% provided vocational training” This means that programs that would help an adolescent get their life together are not promised in jails or prisons, which is a bigger set back in the long haul because their education has now been placed on hold.

When you have several teenagers who spend 15 months in adult prison with no way to continue their education they are more likely to re-offend. Liane Rozzell wrote the article “Alternatives to the Punishment-Oriented Juvenile Justice Model Are Necessary” states that “Children who spend time in adult prisons and jails are at much higher risk for assault, abuse, and suicide. They don’t get the services they need, and they are more likely to re-offend—sooner, more often, and more violently—than youth who stay in the juvenile system.”

Another article written by Donna M. Bishop states that “There is little reason . . . for not holding juveniles responsible under the same laws that apply to adults. The victim of a fifteen-year-old mugger is as much mugged as the victim of a twenty-year-old mugger; the victim of a fourteen-year-old murderer or rapist is as dead or raped as the victim of an older one. The need for social defense or protection is the same.” Meaning some people don’t care how old the person is if they committed a crime than they should be held accountable. I don’t feel this should be the mind set for dealing with people’s lives because we are human and we all make mistakes, especially 16 year old teenagers. A crime such as robbery where no one is murdered should be a 6 month sentence in a juvenile futility and then placed on a 1-2 year probation. They were 16 and they made a stupid mistake.

Apart from their age their background as well should be taken into account because violence is all around us. Some people no nothing different, some are forced into that down spiral of violence. Some people do not have a strong role model to help them on the right path. Criminal Court almost never consider your background as to how to sentence you. However in juvenile court they take under consideration if you have no prior record, the seriousness of the crime everything of that nature. As well as the fact that they are still teenagers and they need to continue their education.

I believe that there needs to be change in our society. Our future depends on our youth and we are convicting them to jail or prison. Instead of spending the taxpayer’s money to convict them, we could use that money for Recreational centers or big bother and big sister programs. The major reason adolescents get into trouble is because they are bored and have nothing positive to keep them busy. You see this a lot in elementary schools when a child is ahead in class they start to act out because they have nothing else to do but wait for the other children to catch up with them. Teenagers well make mistakes we all do and we will continue to make mistakes because we are human. I don’t agree to just let teenagers go about thinking that their actions do not have consequences because they do. However I also do not agree with treating them as adults. It’s not fair that they are kids playing by adult rules.

Works Cited

Bishop, Donna M. “Injustice and Irrationality In.” Injustice and Irrationality In. Criminology & Public Policy,      Nov. 2014. Web. 2 June 2015.

Campaign for Youth Justice. “Placing Juveniles in the Adult Criminal Justice System Is Counterproductive.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “Jailing Juveniles: The Dangers of Incarcerating Youth in Adult Jails in America.” http://www.campaignforyouthjustice.org. 2007. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 2 June 2015

Grimes, Jennifer N. “Aaron Kupchip, Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting Adolescents in Adult and Juvenile Courts.” New York University Press, 10 Aug. 2007. Web. 2 June 2015.

Rozzell, Liane Gay. “Alternatives to the Punishment-Oriented Juvenile Justice Model Are Necessary.” Juvenile Crime. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from “These Are Our Children: New Models Are Transforming Juvenile Justice.” Sojourners Magazine 38 (June 2009): 7. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 3 June 2015.

My Essay 2 Final: The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Dionne Lowewpid-1e3a3e6594574fa672657f9d964a51a5.jpg

Dr. Skutar

English 10001

Analyzing an Ad

05/29/2015

The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

            Lupus is a disease where the autoimmune system attacks the healthy cells and tissues in the body as well as the joints and major organs. Long story short the body fights its self. No one really knows what causes Lupus and it is very hard to diagnose. The YouTube video, Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor} that I watched, posted by LupusEndeavor gave a lot of information about Lupus and all that it does.

When watching this advertisement about Lupus a lot of things suck out to me. For example the purpose, audience, context and genre. The purpose of this ad is to make people aware of Lupus. “Lupus attacks more people than Leukemia, Multiple Sclerosis, Cystic Fibrosis and Muscular Dystrophy combined.” (Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor}). I think this video is very informative because before I was diagnosed with Lupus. I had no idea what it was, and I had never even heard of it for that matter. The video also explains some of the general signs of Lupus. Such as extreme fatigue, arteritis, hair loss, skin rashes and blood disorders. The main goal for this advertisement is to inform the people who come across it about lupus.

The audience the advertisement is trying to communicate to is any and every one. This is because with any disease you want to know what you are up against. This video is not just for people who have Lupus, but for people who have a friend or a relative with Lupus, to inform them about some of the everyday challenges people who have Lupus go through. It’s good for your family and friends to know you that you have Lupus and understand how lupus effects you so that you will have a great support group at home and you don’t have to deal with Lupus alone. This advertisement is for everyone to make the public aware of Lupus and find a cure.

The context of this I thought was great. The symbol for LupusEndeavor is an image of a girl and a wolf at a standoff and the color is purple and black. The reason this symbol is so great is because lupus in Latin means wolf. The color purple is significant because the color for lupus is purple. One of the speakers in this advertisement uses is the phrase “Lupus, a wolf in sheep’s clothing.” (Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor}). This phrase to me means lupus is sneaky just like a wolf. Sometimes you never know when a flair up will occur. I can definitely agree with this, because when I have flair up anything from stress to sleep can cause it. The tone that was used by the speakers in this advertisement were very stern and it has a sense of sadness and pain. When I closed my eyes and just listened to the speakers talk, I was sad and felt that if I did not have lupus this would probably make me sad enough not to want to even look into what lupus was. I think the speaks should have put some cheerfulness into this advertisement because even though I have lupus I smile every day, even though I feel like a train hit me at full speed.

The design of this advertisement is media. It was not just a still picture, it was a video. I like the fact that it was not just a picture because a lot more could be explained, explaining lupus. Having a video instead of just a picture, you can take more from it. Like the information and the different emotions that come with having lupus. The video could have been done professionally or done by a family member holding a video camera, but I cannot tell that just from watching the video.

At the end of the video a website is provided so that I as the viewer can take a closer look at what made the publisher of the video want to use this specific ad to get the message out about Lupus. The president of the website is Jessica Mathews. The reason she decided to make this ad is because her mother was diagnosed with Lupus in 2012 and she wanted make more people aware of Lupus and to help fight to find a cure.

I feel this video advertisement was structured in a very good way, but the video its self is somewhat depressing. If I was just diagnosed with Lupus and came across the video I would feel sad and depressed. The advertisement should bring different emotions to the viewers and make people want to get involved with making more people aware of Lupus as well as finding a cure.

Works Cited

“Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor}.” YouTube. YouTube, 13 Apr. 2013. Web. 26 May 2015.

My Essay 2 Draft: The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Dionne Lowe

Dr. Skutar

English 10001

Analyzing an Ad

05/26/2015

The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

            Lupus is a disease where the immune system attacks the healthy cells and tissues in the body as well as the joints and major organs. Long story short the body fights its self. No one really knows what causes Lupus and it is very hard to diagnose. The YouTube video, Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor} that I watched, posted by LupusEndeavor gave a lot of information about Lupus and all that it does.

When watching this advertisement about Lupus a lot of things suck out to me. For example the purpose, audience, context and genre. The purpose of this ad is to make people aware of Lupus. “Lupus attacks more people than Leukemia, Multiple Sclerosis, Cystic Fibrosis and Muscular Dystrophy combined.” (Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor}). I think this video is very informative because before I was diagnosed with Lupus. I have no idea what it was, had never even heard of it for that matter. The video also explains some of general the signs of Lupus. The main goal for this advertisement is to inform the people who come across it about lupus.

The audience the advertisement is trying to communicate to is any and every one. This is because with any disease you want to know what you are up against. This video is not however for people who just have Lupus but for people who have a friend or a relative with Lupus to inform about them some of the everyday challenges people who have Lupus go through day to day. This advertisement is for everyone to make the public aware of Lupus.

The context of this I thought was great. The symbol for LupusEndeavor is a girl and a wolf at a standoff and the color is purple and black. The reason this symbol is so great is because lupus in Latin means wolf. The color purple is significant because the color for lupus is purple. One of the speakers in this advertisement uses is the phrase “Lupus, a wolf in sheep’s clothing.” (Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor}). This phrase to me means lupus is sneaky just like a wolf. Sometimes you never know when a flair up will occur. When I have flair up anything from stress to sleep can send me into a flair up. I can defiantly agree with this phrase. The tone that was used by the speakers in this very stern and it has a sense of sadness and pain. When I closed my eyes and just listened to the speakers talk I was sad and felt that if did not have lupus this would probably make me sad enough not to want to even look into what lupus was. I think the speaks should have put some cheerfulness into this advertisement because even though I have lupus I smile every day, even though I feel like a train hit me at full speed. I also think more color and pictures of happy people with lupus should have been used.

The design of this advertisement is media. It was not just a still picture, it was a video. I like the fact that it was not just a picture because a lot more could be explained, explaining lupus.

I feel this video advertisement was structured in a very good way but I think it could have been more colors and images because the video its self is somewhat depressing. If I was just diagnosed with Lupus and came across the video I would feel sad and depressed. So color and images could really bring different emotions to the views and make people want to get involved with making more people aware of Lupus.

Works Cited

“Confronting the Wolf Commercial {The Lupus Endeavor}.” YouTube. YouTube, 13 Apr. 2013. Web. 26 May 2015.

My Final For Essay 1: Technology Evolving in the Criminal Justice System

wpid-public-safety-is-none-of-your.jpgDionne Lowe

Dr. Skutar

English 10001

05/14/2015

Technology Evolving in the Criminal Justice System

Technology has consistently been improving all around us; from basic cell phones evolving into smartphones and computers evolving into laptops. With technology gradually developing every day, the possibilities are endless. Technology in the criminal justice system has also improved greatly over the years; both scientifically and mechanically. Scientifically, the first big breakthrough was fingerprinting. This was such a great help to investigators, because no two fingerprints are the same. The next big breakthrough was the development of DNA which has released so many innocent men from prison. The duration for solving a case has also been cut in half due to the advancement of DNA. Mechanically, in 2009, Tasers or Stun Guns were becoming a big improvement in the criminal justice system. They gave police a different method to control an out of control situation without a fatal result. But after a few deaths by the stun gun they were not as favored anymore. The latest technology breakthrough are cameras. The FBI caught the Boston Bombers just by using the cameras from the public and the cameras from the surrounding buildings. Cameras are no longer just for capturing great memories. They are also great for helping the police and FBI capture what a witness did not. Not only is technology improving our everyday lives, but it’s also improving the security of our society by helping the criminal justice system.

Because of the recent deaths of young unarmed black men such as; Micheal Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland. People want answers and they are tired of the police brutality. It’s the word of the accused against the police department. In order to get the whole story and the understanding of everything, people are pushing police departments all over the United States to start wearing body cameras. The Los Angeles Times wrote an article, “Putting body cameras on cops” which stated, “The Los Angeles Police Department has committed to outfitting all officers on patrol with body cameras starting next year. The effort was launched last year by Police Commission President Steve Soboroff, but it gained momentum after deadly encounters between police and unarmed black men in Ferguson, Mo.” With no one really knowing the truth but the victim and the accused, having police wear body cameras will bring us the whole story. A camera is a way to have solid evidence, without the inconsistency of witness. The article “Putting body cameras on cops” also states that “the cameras will change the nature of police encounters and bring clarity to accusations of abuse. Too often in cases of alleged police misconduct, there’s no clear record of what happened. Conflicting witness statements, blurry cellphone videos from bystanders and officers’ after-the-fact accounts can make it impossible to confirm or refute allegations.”(The Los Angeles Times). In the future, there won’t be any misunderstanding about who did what, which will bring the community closer together. The community will gain faith in the criminal justice system and feel that every United States citizen, regardless of race, are being treated with same the respect.

The article also identifies three of the steps that must be taken in order to set this futuristic plan into play which are buying the cameras, teaching the officers how to use their new equipment, and how the recording of the camera can be used if it is needed. The article also states that there are a number of questions that need to be answered which are, “When will an officer switch on the camera and under what conditions may he or she turn it off? How will the department protect the privacy of individuals captured on video? Will officers record inside people’s homes? Who will have access to the recordings and how long will the LAPD keep them? Will officers be able to review the videos before writing their incident reports?” These are questions that have to be answered in order to protect both the public and the police departments. Ryan Marshall the author of “Rockville considers police body cameras” states more privacy issues that come along with police departments wearing body cameras which are “If an officer is in someone’s house and a resident asks that the camera be turned off, should the officer comply?” With these questions not answered, the push for every police department to wear body cameras will have to be put on hold.

Tony Saavedra wrote an article called “From batons to body cameras: Move to put video on each officer is only the latest step in the evolution of technology and police work” in which he states that “Police experts warn that any technology is only as good as the person using it.” This means that just because police officers have the cameras does not mean they will know exactly how to use them if put in a situation where they would need them most. Sam Walker a criminal justice professor states, “Used properly, it’s a very important innovation. The problems have come up when officers use it inappropriately.” (Saavedra).

To narrow down my major, I want to become a Criminal Prosecutor. Having evidence such as video footage from a body camera, would be very solid evidence to use inside a courtroom to prosecute an officer for police brutality. Keith Alexander, the author of “New role for District police body cameras” states that, “Video footage can be used as evidence at trails in addition to protecting officers, residents.” This will be another breakthrough because now there will be no he said/she said there will just be the video footage from the body camera. Another article wrote by Romero McKenzie, wrote a “Forum emphasizes support for police body cameras” states that “Civil rights attorney Randall Edwards The best way to keep claims about use of excessive force from coming against officers is for them to stop using excessive force. I believe that as an officer looks at the ladder of escalating force, he will be very, very circumspect about drawing his gun or weapon if he knows he is going to have to be accountable.” Meaning that body cameras are a great start to stopping police brutality but at the heart of the situation police departments, and police officers should stop the use excessive force to begin with.

Body Cameras will definitely become a great advancement towards the future. Technology will become more and more advanced over the years. It will also save many lives. Buying the cameras will be more cost effective, than a lawsuit from a family that has lost a loved one by the hands of a police officer. It will protect the community as well as the police department therefore improving the security of our society.

 

Works Cited

Alexander, Keith L. “New Role for District Police Body Cameras.” ProQuest. Washington Post, 26 Jan. 2015. Web. 12 May 2015.

Marshall, Ryan. “Rockville Considers Police Body Cameras.” ProQuest. Washington, D.C, 14 May 2015. Web. 21 May 2015.

McKenzie, Romero. “Forum Emphasizes Support for Police Body Cameras.” ProQuest. Deseret News Publishing Company, 4 Dec. 2014. Web. 12 May 2015.

“Putting Body Cameras on Cops.” ProQuest. The Los Angeles Times, 18 Dec. 2014. Web. 12 May 2015.

Saavedra, Tony. “From Batons to Body Cameras.” ProQuest. Organge County Register, 23 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 May 2015.

My draft: Technology Evolving in the Criminal Justice System

Dionne Lowe

Dr. Skutar

English 10001

05/14/2015

Technology Evolving in the Criminal Justice System

Technology has always been improving all around us, from basic cell phones evolving into smartphones and computers evolving into laptops. With technology evolving every day, the possibilities are endless. Technology in the criminal justice system has also improved greatly over the years, both scientifically and mechanically. Scientifically, the first big breakthrough was fingerprinting. This was such a great help to investigators because no two fingerprints are the same, so that only leaves one answer as to who committed a crime. The next big breakthrough was DNA which has released so many innocent men from prison. The time solving a case has also been cut in half because of DNA. Mechanically, in 2009, Tasers or Stun Guns were becoming a big improvement in the criminal justice system. They gave police a different method to control an out of control situation without a fatal result. But after a few deaths by the stun gun they were not as favored anymore. The latest technology breakthrough are cameras. The FBI caught the Boston Bombers just by using the cameras from the public and the cameras from the surrounding buildings. Cameras are no longer just for capturing great memories. They are also great for helping the police and FBI capture what a witness did not. Not only is technology improving our everyday lives, but it’s also improving the security of our society by helping the criminal justice system.

Because of the recent deaths of young unarmed black men such as Micheal Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Freddie Gray in Baltimore, people want answers and they are tired of the police brutality. It’s the word of the accused against the police department. In order to get the whole story and the understanding of everything, people are pushing police departments all over the United States to start wearing body cameras. The Los Angeles Times wrote an article, “Putting body cameras on cops” which stated, “The Los Angeles Police Department has committed to outfitting all officers on patrol with body cameras starting next year. The effort was launched last year by Police Commission President Steve Soboroff, but it gained momentum after deadly encounters between police and unarmed black men in Ferguson, Mo.” With no one really knowing the truth but the victim and the accused, having police wear body cameras will bring us the whole story. A camera does not have a bad memory or remember things differently from witness to witness. The article “Putting body cameras on cops” also states that “the cameras will change the nature of police encounters and bring clarity to accusations of abuse. Too often in cases of alleged police misconduct, there’s no clear record of what happened. Conflicting witness statements, blurry cellphone videos from bystanders and officers’ after-the-fact accounts can make it impossible to confirm or refute allegations.” In the future, there won’t be any misunderstanding about who did what, which will bring the community closer together. The community will gain faith in the criminal justice system as well as feel that everyone black and white are being treated with same the respect.

The article also identifies three of the steps that must be taken in order to set this futuristic plan into play which are buying the cameras, teaching the officers how to use their new equipment, as well as how the recording of the camera can be used if it is needed. The article also states that there are a number of questions that need to be answered which are, “When will an officer switch on the camera and under what conditions may he or she turn it off? How will the department protect the privacy of individuals captured on video? Will officers record inside people’s homes? Who will have access to the recordings and how long will the LAPD keep them? Will officers be able to review the videos before writing their incident reports?” These are questions that have to be answered in order to protect both the public and the police departments.

Tony Saavedra wrote an article called “From batons to body cameras: Move to put video on each officer is only the latest step in the evolution of technology and police work” in which he states that “Police experts warn that any technology is only as good as the person using it.” This means that just because police officers have the cameras does not mean they will know exactly how to use them if put in a situation where they would need them most. Sam Walker a criminal justice professor says, “Used properly, it’s a very important innovation. The problems have come up when officers use it inappropriately.” Technology is only as good as the person who is using to do what it’s supposed to do.

To narrow down my major, I want to become a Criminal Prosecutor. Having evidence such as video footage from a body camera, would be very solid evidence to use inside a courtroom to prosecute an officer for police brutality. Keith Alexander, the author of “New role for District police body cameras” states that “Video footage can be used as evidence at trails in addition to protecting officers, residents.” This will be another breakthrough because now there will be no he said/she said there will just be the video footage from the body camera. Another article wrote by Romero McKenzie, wrote a “Forum emphasizes support for police body cameras” states that “Civil rights attorney Randall Edwards The best way to keep claims about use of excessive force from coming against officers is for them to stop using excessive force. I believe that as an officer looks at the ladder of escalating force, he will be very, very circumspect about drawing his gun or weapon if he knows he is going to have to be accountable.” Meaning that body cameras are a great start to stopping police brutality but at the heart of the situation police departments, and police officers should stop the use excessive force to begin with.

Body Cameras will definitely become a great advance toward the future. Technology will become more and more advanced over the years. It will as so save so many lives. Buying the cameras will cost less, than a lawsuit from a family that has lost a loved one by the hands of a police officer. It will protect the community as well as the police department therefore improving the security of our society.

 

Works Cited

Alexander, Keith L. “New Role for District Police Body Cameras.” ProQuest. Washington Post, 26 Jan. 2015. Web. 12 May 2015.

McKenzie, Romero. “Forum Emphasizes Support for Police Body Cameras.” ProQuest. Deseret News Publishing Company, 4 Dec. 2014. Web. 12 May 2015.

“Putting Body Cameras on Cops.” ProQuest. The Los Angeles Times, 18 Dec. 2014. Web. 12 May 2015.

Saavedra, Tony. “From Batons to Body Cameras.” ProQuest. Orange County Register, 23 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 May 2015.

Hi Everyone,

My name is Dionne Lowe. I am 20 years old. I love to read and write. My major is Criminal Justice, I hope to one day become a prosecutor.